Debuting OFT’s LGBTQ Workshop

For the past 3 weeks, OFT has spoken at three different schools: Princeton University, New York University and Columbia University. At all three schools we talked about the US-Taiwan-China relations. This was the hot topic as everyone wanted to learn more about this trilateral relationship especially with Trump as president. However, today, we debuted our first workshop about LGBTQ Movement in Taiwan.
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Our First Appearance at ITASA

This Saturday was OFT had the pleasure of hosting a workshop at the 2017 Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Student Association – East Coast Conference (ITASA ECC.) It was a milestone hit; an achievement unlocked. Since the founding of OFT, being able to hold a standalone workshop at ITASA had been Jenny and my dream. I had been to ITASA during my time at Rutgers TASA, and it was an amazing venue for Taiwanese American groups of different colleges to meet, and bond with each other while learning more about Taiwan. Continue reading “Our First Appearance at ITASA”

Donald Trump and Taiwan: The future of US-Taiwan Relations

Leaders speak for the first time in decades

After a historic election, President-elect Donald Trump continued to surprise the world by accepting a congratulatory call from the President of Taiwan, Tsai Ing-wen, on December 2nd: Trump congratulated her back, as Tsai became the first female president of Taiwan just earlier this year. This is the first time leaders from the two nations have spoken to each other since 1979. In 1978, the US ended diplomatic ties with Taiwan, aka the Republic of China (ROC), in order to being relations with the People’s Republic of China (PRC). The call has angered the PRC, which immediately filed a complaint to the White House, claiming that Trump is not honoring the One China Policy.

Back in the 70’s, the ROC on Taiwan claimed that it was still the sole, legal representative of China after having been driven out of mainland China by the Communist Party in 1949. Fast-forward to modern day, and the ROC gave up its dream to recapture China and instead focused on governing Taiwan; it democratized to incorporate the Taiwanese locals into the government and had its first democratic presidential election in 1996. However, the ROC is still the Republic of China on paper, and the PRC threatens war if the Taiwan “province” decides to declare formal independence and separate from the country of China.

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How the US Election Might Affect My Home: Taiwan

Many people say that they will leave the country if their preferred candidate doesn’t win the upcoming presidential election. This is the first election that I will be eligible to vote in, after becoming a naturalized citizen in 2015. To me, this election means more than just what will happen in the states, I believe it is important to elect the candidate who will be the best both my home country, Taiwan, and the US. I wanted to do a shallow exploration of what US and Taiwan relations would look like in either presidency and to see if it moving home is a viable option in the event I am unhappy with the turnout of the new America each candidate has envisioned. After taking a further look into each candidate’s policies, you can see how much of an impact voting for one candidate or the other can have on the international stage. Continue reading “How the US Election Might Affect My Home: Taiwan”

Father’s Day: Celebrating Together

I could always get a good laugh from my dad with my sisters whenever we attempted a golf swing at the driving range. Swing and a miss. What a whiff. Even when I couldn’t get a good swing at that little pretentious golf ball still standing there, my dad would always try to guide me toward a better swing. On days when my dad only wants to practice his swings and improve his own game, he would always still take the time to help me out with mine. This is what I look up to as my personal role model, always willing to give a helping hand.  

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Taiwan: Who Are You?

What started out looking like any other simple interview blew up into something that touched some controversial past history. Last month Hung Su-Chu (洪素珠), a contributor to the People Post citizen journalist platform, was shown on a video chasing an elderly man at the 228 Memorial Park in the southern city of Kaohsiung. She questioned him on why he came to Taiwan, in which he responded that he came with his parents in 1950. She started yelling at him, telling him to go back to China. Continue reading “Taiwan: Who Are You?”